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Thread: Light chart's

  1. #21

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    Don't no if this any good to any one - http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/f...osythesis.html
    It's kelvin chart diagrams some explainations undernieth, helped me a litle.
    Fear is not the natural state of mankind

  2. #22

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    Default What is a Lumen?

    A lumen is a unit of standard measurement used to describe how much light is contained in a certain area. The lumen is part of a group of standard measurements known as the photometry group, which measure different aspects of light. This group also includes such units as the candela, which measures luminance, and the lux, which measures illuminance.

    Strictly speaking, a lumen is defined as one candela multiplied by one steradian, which can be expressed as: 1(lm) = 1(cd) x 1(sr). A related unit of measurement — although not part of the standard units — is the foot-candle, which is often used in photography and film. To really understand what a lumen is, it is important to understand these units: the candela, the foot-candle, the steradian, and the lux.

    Although not entirely necessary to understand the lumen, there is an important distinction to be made between measures of radiance and measures of illuminance. When measuring radiance, you are basically looking at how much energy a light source is releasing directly. You’re not interested in what happens to that energy as it leaves the source, just in how much is at the source itself. When you’re measuring illuminance, by contrast, you are looking at how much of that energy makes it to a given object.

    The foot-candle, also spelled footcandle, is the non-standard measure of illuminance, basically defined as how much light would strike the inner surface of a sphere one foot in radius if it were lit by a single candle in the center of that sphere. The lux is the standard measure of illuminance, and can be defined simply as how much light would strike a similar sphere of one meter in radius. The two can be converted simply, with 10.76 lux to one foot-candle.

    Both the foot-candle and the lux make use of a measure of luminous intensity, called the candela. The candela was originally called the candlepower and simply referred to the amount of luminous energy emitted by a known type of candle. Later, when it was standardized, a definition was chosen that would approximate the older definition, so that existing equations could remain the same. The modern definition of the candela has to do with the radiation emitted by 1/60 of a single square centimeter of platinum when it is at its melting point.

    A steradian is a standard unit of measurement used to define a solid angle. The technical definition of a steradian is the solid angle subtended at the center of a sphere of radius r by a portion of the surface of the sphere having an area of r2. In this definition, subtended has to do with the relationship between the length of the arc and the resulting angle. The steradian is unitless and is represented by the abbreviation sr. Mathematically, using the meter as a unit of measurement, we can then define a steradian as 1(sr) = m2 x m-1.

    So, taking all of this together, we can now interpret our original definition of a lumen as 1(lm) = 1(cd) x 1(sr). One lumen in this case is a measure of the amount of luminous flux emitted into an area by 1/60 of a single square centimeter of platinum at its melting point into a certain angle. A lumen measurement is often used along with wattage to determine the luminous efficiency of a light-emitting body.

    For example, a normal 100 watt light-bulb has a luminous efficiency of about 17.5, emitting 1750 lumens of light. A 13 watt fluorescent bulb, by contrast, has an efficiency of about 56, emitting around 730 lumens of light. The sun, in contrast, has an efficiency of around 93.



    hope this is of some help


    cheers dj#

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  4. #23

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    Default Compact Fluorescent Lights

    Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

    Compact fluorescent lights, or CFLs, are constantly in the news due to their energy efficient qualities. Not only do these light bulbs utilize less energy, but they produce less heat helping to save energy in cooling costs and prolonging the life of the bulb.


    How CF Light Bulbs Work:-

    Compact fluorescent bulbs produce light that's more diffuse than incandescent bulbs, so they are very good for area lighting.

    Compact fluorescent bulbs use about one fifth of the energy of an incandescent bulb to produce the same amount of light. A good comparison ratio takes an 11 watt CFL to replace a traditional 60-watt bulb. The lower wattage equals less energy use and less heat output. Look for packages that provide conversions for consumers to get the best fitting bulb for your needs.


    Considerations When Using Compact Flourescent Bulbs:-

    CFLs can cause interference with devices such as radios and computers. In this event, move the lamp or the electronic devices away from each other.

    The start-up time of a compact fluorescent bulb can be slower than an incandescent bulb, even though the colour and brightness are similar.

    Compact fluorescent bulbs contain trace amounts of mercury, so when they burn out they need to be disposed of properly to prevent environmental damage.


    Save Energy, Money and the Environment with Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

    If you want to change the world, start by changing a few light bulbs. It is one of the best things you can do for the environment - and your budget!


    Reasons to Switch to Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

    On top of that, replacing one regular light bulb with an approved compact fluorescent light bulb can save consumers £15 in energy costs over the life of the bulb.

    Compact fluorescent light bulbs use at least 80% less energy than standard incandescent bulbs to provide the same amount of light, and they last up to 10 times longer. Compact fluorescent light bulbs also generate 70 percent less heat, so they are safer to operate and can also reduce energy costs associated with cooling homes and offices.


    The only real drawback to using compact fluorescent bulbs is that each one contains about 5 mg of mercury, a toxic heavy metal that can cause serious health problems if inhaled or ingested over a period of time or in large enough doses. As a result, many environmentalists and other experts recommend recycling compact fluorescent light bulbs so that they don't end up in landfills.


    How Much Can You Save by Using Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs?

    For most people, switching from incandescent to compact fluorescent bulbs offers a lot of opportunity for energy and cost savings.
    Lighting accounts for 20 percent of the electric bill in the average UK home, and the average home has approximately 30 light fixtures.


    To save the most energy and money by using compact fluorescent light bulbs,we recommend replacing standard bulbs in areas where lights are used frequently and left on for a long time, such as family rooms, living rooms, kitchens, dining rooms, and porches.


    Choosing the Right Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

    To make sure you get the same amount of light when replacing standard bulbs with compact fluorescent light bulbs, check the lumen rating on the light you are replacing and purchase a compact fluorescent light bulb with the same lumen rating. (A lumen rating is the measure of light the bulb puts out.)


    Wattage varies greatly between standard light bulbs and compact fluorescent light bulbs. Compact fluorescent light bulbs typically use about one fifth of the wattage used by standard bulbs to produce the same amount of light. So to replace a traditional 60 watt bulb, look for a compact fluorescent light bulb that is about 11 watts.


    Compact fluorescent light bulbs are available in many different sizes and shapes to fit in almost any fixture—from three-way lamps to dimmer switches—for both indoor and outdoor use. Compact fluorescent light bulbs also come in a variety of colour temperatures, which helps determine the colour and brightness of the light each bulb provides. (Learn more about the brightness, colour and light quality of compact fluorescent light bulbs.)


    Brightness and Colour of Light:-

    How good or poor a given light appears can be described in three basic ways: how much light is present, the quality of the light (is it bright or dull or does it produce glare?) and what its colour characteristics are.


    Watts and Lumens: How much light?


    Light output, measured in lumens, refers to how much light leaves a light source. Because we are so used to incandescent bulbs, we usually describe the amount of light with watts. The number of watts is actually the amount of power the bulb uses. For an incandescent bulb this can be a misleading number because 90 percent of the watts is wasted as heat instead of making light.

    To compare brightness between incandescent bulbs and the more efficient compact fluorescents, the quantity of light is expressed in lumens as well as wattage. As with watts, a higher number of lumens means a stronger light. The chart shows lumen levels to look for when replacing a given bulb.

    Incandescent ~ CFL >Lumens
    40W ~ 9-11W > 490
    60W ~ 11-14W > 490
    75W ~ 15-19W > 900
    100W ~ 20-25W > 1,200
    150W ~ 26-29W > 1,750
    200W ~ 38-42W > 2,600

    If you don't want to print this page out, remember this rule of thumb: CFLs use about a fifth of the wattage to produce the same light. So to replace a traditional 60-watt bulb, look for a CFL that's about 11 watts.


    Lumen output deteriorates over time from a number of factors, including the ballast's electronics, variations in supply voltage, dust and dirt.


    Colour:-

    How does a light render an object's colours, and what colour is the light itself? These characteristics are expressed through the Correlated Colour temperature (CCT) and Colour Rendering Index (CRI).


    Correlated colour temperature (CCT)


    Light has colour, whether it emanates from the moon, the sun or your favorite reading light. It might tend toward orange (think of parking lot lights illuminating the night), yellow (most reading lights) or white (daylight).


    Imagine heating a piece of metal gradually. As it heats up, it changes colour. At first, it appears orange, then yellow and then blue or blue-white. The Correlated Colour Temperature indicates how warm or cool light is. For a light colour close to incandescent bulbs, look for a CCT range between 2650 and 3000 degrees Kelvin. This range is referred to as warm white. Common CF bulb colours are 2700K, 3000K, 3500K and 4100K. (The Kelvin scale and its units refer to absolute temperature; 0 degrees Kelvin refers to the point at which no heat energy remains in a substance.)

    CCT measurements:
    • 2650-3200K – warm white (yellowish-white)
    • 4000K – white
    • 4000K– cool
    • 6500K - Daylight


    Colour Rendering Index (CRI)


    This is a numeric representation of a light bulb's ability to show colours "realistically," compared to a standard incandescent. The CRI scale ranges from 0 to 100—the higher the number, the closer to what you're used to. For good colour quality, look for compact fluorescents with CRIs of 80 or above.


    Light Technology Basics


    About 85 percent of our perceptions come from our eyes, so lighting is important to what we do whether we're aware of it or not. Light can be produced naturally (like sunlight) or artificially.

    To produce artificial light, electrical energy is transformed into light. This generally occurs in one of two ways:

    • Incandescence, in which current passes through a filament, which heats and then glows, or
    • Gas discharge, in which current passes through a gas. The atoms glow, giving off ultraviolet light, which reacts with phosphor to produce visible light.

    Energy-saving compact fluorescent light bulbs produce light using gas discharge.

    -------------------------<+>------------------------


    hope this information is of some help


    cheers dj#

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  6. #24

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    totaly class thread thats why thctalk is the only place i visit for info

    cheers daveyb11

  7. #25

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    Noticed this one had dissappeared thought it might help ..




  8. #26

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    just a quick question my other half is a photographer, she has lighting for her job, can I use these lights, they are 65w 5400k 50/60hz, just curious is I can use these.

  9. #27

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    cool stuff thanks

  10. #28

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    i just purchased an eco-light 6500k white/blue light,do you know what the best hight is for seedlings as im growing in a box 2.5x2.5x4.5 foot so small wardrobe size??

  11. #29

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    Another chart.................
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  12. #30

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    what light should i use to root my clones?.
    right now i am using a 600 hps during the day because i have me flowering plants there so at night i have a 250 in a diffrant place but the same clones any tips?

  13. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkdj2003 View Post



    Spectrum:



    The diagram above shows the full range of light and where each type of lighting system falls within that range. Artificial lights produce just a slice of the full range. This leads to much discussion and experimentation to determine which, or which combination of lighting is best for a particular crop.

    Lets establish a reference point to work from, examine several types of lighting and put this information to practical use.

    Reference point: For most of the daylight hours, the outside daylight peak is centered on 5500 degrees Kelvin (refer to the above chart).

    Metal Halide: These lights emit a light on the bluish side of the spectrum. They are considered a grow light and it is considered that they produce a more stalky vegetative type of growth in plants. These lights are commonly used throughout all phases of plant growth and produce excellent results.

    Agro Sun Halide: Agro Sun is a hybrid halide bulb that generates extra red light for flower and fruit production. This is considered to be the best choice for artificial lighting of plants.

    Sodium Vapor: Sodium vapor lighting is way down in the red. There is some indication as well as a lot of marketing hype that the spectrum produced by these lights promote flowering. Personally, I'd like to see a scientific study to verify this.

    The bottom line on spectrum: Spectrum is secondary to the over all
    indensity. Remember, in any artificial lighting situation, we are able to
    provide only a fraction of natural lighting. Therefore, it is more
    important to provide intensity than any other lighting factor. For
    example if you have to choose between a 70 watt sodium vapor and a
    400 watt metal halide the only choice is the 400 watt system. The over
    all performance will be much greater, even if you favor a certain spectrum.
    Just to clarify, the first chart says you can have a 400 watt HPS at 6 inches?

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  15. #32

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    great thread and i found it most informative, any similar info available as to the use of CFL's ?

  16. #33

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    I am a first time grower and (half way through flowering no) and have been using a Sunmaster Dual Spectrum Lamp (600w) throughout the grow. How do these dual spectrum lamps compare to having a specific veg lamp and then a specific bloom lamp? Will quality or yield suffer?

  17. #34

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    Lumens per squar foot= 1,000 Good, 2,000 Better, and 3,000 best. Good luck and happy growing

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    Nice ill use this

  19. #36

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    Some great info on this thread

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    Quote Originally Posted by hotshot View Post
    Lumens per squar foot= 1,000 Good, 2,000 Better, and 3,000 best. Good luck and happy growing
    And one more thing, an HPS has 6 PAR per watt, this is what the plants see's. We see the lumens.

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    Lol. I think I have just twigged why my auto which is now nearly 7 weeks old isnt bursting out all over, great chart, thanks :-)

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  23. #39

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    Excellent post on light and lights

    Sent from my Nexus 9 using Tapatalk

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